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NDIAS fellowships

The Notre Dame Institute for Advanced Study (NDIAS) is dedicated to fostering and supporting integrative scholarship addressing ultimate questions at the intersection of the arts, engineering, humanities, law, and natural, physical, and social sciences, especially those which transcend disciplinary boundaries.

Instructions for Graduate Student Fellowship Application
Graduate Student Fellowship Online Application

The NDIAS encourages graduate student applicants to include questions of values in their analyses, to integrate diverse disciplines, and to ask how their findings advance civilization. The Institute offers its fellows the opportunity to engage not only in analysis but also in evaluating what should be done, to analyze the world in substantive and collaborative ways, and to think through the implications of present behavior for the future of the world.

As a collaborative academic community, the Institute cultivates the contemplative ideal that is an essential factor in the Catholic intellectual tradition and vital for the progression of scholarship. The greatest advances do not occur in solitude, but in the company of others who share a passion for advancement and are open to dialogue and collaboration.

Wilson Center Fellowships

Through an international competition, the Center offers 9-month residential fellowships. The Wilson Center invites scholars, practitioners, journalists and public intellectuals to take part in its flagship international Fellowship Program. Fellows conduct research and write in their areas of interest, while interacting with policymakers in Washington and Wilson Center staff and other scholars in residence.  The Center accepts policy-relevant, non-advocacy fellowship proposals that address key challenges confronting the United States and the world.  

The Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars aims to unite the world of ideas to the world of policy by supporting pre-eminent scholarship and linking that scholarship to issues of concern to officials in Washington.

Congress established the Center in 1968 as the official, national memorial to President Wilson. Unlike the physical monuments in the nation's capital, it is a living memorial whose work and scholarship commemorates "the ideals and concerns of Woodrow Wilson." As both a distinguished scholar and national leader, President Wilson felt strongly that the scholar and the policymaker were "engaged in a common enterprise." Today the Center takes seriously his views on the need to bridge the gap between the world of ideas and public policy, bringing them into creative contact, enriching the work of both, and enabling each to learn from the other. This continuing dialogue between public policy and scholarship makes the Center unique.

UNESCO/Japan Young Researchers' Fellowships Programme

UNESCO/Japan Young Researchers' Fellowships Programme (UNESCO/Keizo Obuchi Research Fellowships Programme)

What is it about?
Reinforcing its belief in “people building the next era”, the Government of Japan offers 20 fellowships per year, for the twelfth consecutive year, to be awarded to deserving candidates from developing countries, especially the least developed countries (LDCs), who are eager to undertake research on one or more of the topics listed below. The aim of the fellowships is to support innovative and imaginative post-graduate research in four areas of development of particular interest to UNESCO.

UNESCO designed the project “UNESCO/Keizo Obuchi Research Fellowships Programme” (UNESCO/Japan Young Researchers’ Fellowship Programme) in the framework of the Japanese Funds-in-Trust for the Capacity-Building of Human Resources which was established in November 2000 by the Government of Japan to enable UNESCO to give impetus to research in four areas under UNESCO’s Priority Programme Areas.

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